Coorg Pork Pandi Curry – Love at first bite!!

This photo of Coorg Cuisine is courtesy of TripAdvisor

Coorg a.k.a Kodagu is a picturesque town located in the foot hills of Karnataka between Mysore and Mangalore. As the legend goes Coorgis are regarded as the descendants of the Greeks. It is believed that when Alexander the Great invaded India in 327 BC, the Greek soldiers married the local women and settled along the coastline. In 1834 the British East India Company took control of Kodagu and gave it the English name Coorg. The locals remained loyal to the British until they left India. Coorg today is one of the most sought after tourist destination in India. Its sprawling coffee and pepper plantations, spectacular waterfalls and luscious greenery are a treat for the eye.

pandi curry

Pork Pandi Curry

The Kodava cuisine is quite different to rest of India. As the Kodavas were a warrior tribe they mostly ate non vegetarian because of what was available off the land.  The cuisine is quite season specific and uses only locally sourced spices, vegetable, fruits and meat. The Kodavas use spices very sparingly and the dishes are not an overdose of spices and masalas. Every dish retains the flavour of its key ingredients. Fat is used quite moderately and mostly used for tempering. Meat dishes are cooked in their own fat. One of the most common ingredient used in every Kodava house hold is the “Kachampuli” which is a dark sticky vinegar similar to balsamic. It is extracted from the ripe fruits of the Kodambuli fruit. The fruits are usually placed in baskets over large vessels to allow the juice to gently drip down over a few days as the fruit gradually becomes pulp. The extract thickens over time, this souring agent is typically used towards the end of the cooking process in many Kodava dishes (including the Pandi curry) and elevates the flavours of the meat.

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Kachampuli

Some of the famous dishes of the Kodava cuisine are Koovaleputtu which is a savoury item made from ripe jack fruit or banana, steamed in banana leaves. Kadumbuttu is rice-flour balls and are staples in every household. Bamboo shoot curry is cooked during the monsoon. ‘Akki roti’ with ‘Ellu Pajji’ (Sesame seeds chutney) is a popular breakfast among the kodavas. Cooked rice is used as an ingredient for making the Akki roti. A few more popular chutneys come from the seeds of the jack fruit which are boiled and worked into a chutney with coconut and lots of lime — a seasonal breakfast accompaniment to akki rotis, as is a delicious chutney made of kaipuli (or bitter orange which is a wild fruit).  And finally one of the most definitive dish of the Kodava cuisine the infamous “Pork Pandi Curry”. During the British Raj the Generals used to hunt the wild boar and their chefs who were the local Kodavas use to cook the Pandi curry with the wild boar. As hunting is now banned in India hence the curry is now cooked with pork and the most important ingredient being the Kachampuli vinegar. Pandi Curry is served with Kadumbuttu (rice-flour balls) and I can promise you that this dish is “Love at first bite”. I have listed the recipe below.

spices

Spice Market

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South Indian Spice Mix

Pork Pandi Curry 

Ingredients

1 kg Pork belly diced

1 tsp Red chilli Powder

1 tsp Turmeric Powder

Salt to taste

4 pcs of green chilli slit in half

1  1/2 tbsp Ginger paste

1 1/2 tbsp Garlic paste

5 Banana shallots finely sliced

2 tbsp Rapeseed Oil

1 tbsp Whole coriander seed

1/2 tbsp whole cumin seed

1 tbsp Whole black pepper

5 Green Cardamom

1 tsp Mustard seeds

1/4 tsp Fenugreek Seed

4 Cloves

1 inch stick Cinnamon

1 tsp Kachampuli or 1 tbsp thick tamarind pulp

10-12 fresh curry leaves (optional)

A few sprigs of Coriander Leaves for garnish.

Method 

  1. Clean and wash the diced pork belly under running cold water. Place it in a colander and drain excess water.
  2. Marinate the pork with salt, red chilli powder, turmeric powder, ginger and garlic paste and leave it marinating for 1 hr.
  3. Dry roast the whole spices and grind to a fine powder. (Mustard, coriander, cumin, cinnamon, cloves, black pepper and fenugreek.) Keep aside.
  4. Heat oil in a cooking pot. Add the sliced shallots and cook till golden brown.
  5. Add the marinated pork and stir fry for 8-10 mins and add the ground spices and continue to stir fry for further 5 mins.
  6. Add two cups of hot water and slow cook the pork for approximately 45 mins to an hour or until the pork is tender. You could pressure cook it as well, to save time however I would recommend slow cooking the pork.
  7. Once the pork is cooked add the slit green chilli, curry leaves and kachampuli. If there is excess liquid cook off the pork on high heat at this stage, as the pork needs to be rich, dark and have a thick coating sauce.
  8. Garnish with a few sprigs of coriander leaves and serve with steam rice, chapatti, Akki roti or Kadumbuttu (rice-flour balls).

 

akki roti

Akki Roti

Photo Credit – Radha Ganapathy

For those who don’t know about the food of Coorg’s other communities, a Mappila meal is a must. The Mappilas of northern Kerala have been in Coorg for at least two generations cooking robust meals of chicken gravy and fish curry with Malabari porottas, as well as luscious biryanis.

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Fish Curry

Happy Cooking !!!

 

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The French Connection -Provence meets Pondicherry

Pondicherry (officially renamed as Puducherry) is located in the southern part of India, along the coastline of Bay of Bengal and often referred to as the “French Riviera of the East” about 160 km south of Chennai . The town served as the capital of French territories in India until 1954 when it was ceded to the Government of India. Dutch were the first to settle down before handing it over to the French. Pondicherry is synonymous with French Heritage in India and centuries of French rule has imparted this place a strong French feel in its architecture, monuments and food.

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The restaurants in Pondicherry are Indo-French. Indian restaurateurs offering authentic French food or Creole cuisine, it’s not just French cuisine that blends with a Tamilian style of cooking; there are also influences of the Portuguese, Malaysian and Mughals, among others. The food is surprisingly mild. Pondicherry cuisine is a unique and vibrant fusion of Tamil and French cuisine. French dishes in Pondicherry have been adapted to suit tastebuds used to spicier Indian food yet with minimal use of spices. The textures and flavours are far less robust. The thick gravies that we know so well are notably thinner, like the French sauces. Other highlights are the use of chicken or seafood stock in cooking and the appearance of baguettes amidst local desserts.Even the style of cooking,  is slow and elaborate. The spices are far more delicately used and do not overwhelm. The use of dried spices, fresh local catch from the sea and ample use of pungent vinegar much more than tomatoes or tamarind make this cuisine a delicious mix of flavours, and a melting pot of many cultures.

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To experience more I would suggest that you should pack your bags and visit this beautiful paradise. In the meanwhile please try my simple Seafood stew recipe thats an ode to the two great cuisines.

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Fruits de mer Pondichéry curry

 

Ingredients

1 kg Cod fillet

12 king prawns raw and headless

12 Fresh mussels scrubbed and beard removed

250 Gms squid

4 tbsp vegetable oil

8 – 10 shallots

8 garlic cloves

2 tbsp chopped ginger

1 tbsp. coriander seeds

1 tbsp. cumin seeds

1/2 tbsp Black Peppercorn

4 dried whole red chillies

1 tsp turmeric powder

½ tsp aniseed powder

Salt to taste

2 cups of coconut milk

½ cup of fresh grated coconut

12-15 curry leaves

1 tbsp vinegar

 

Method

  •     Cut the fillet of cod into 6 -8 pieces. De vien and remove the shell from the prawns keeping the tails on. Clean and wash the mussels in cold water, removing the beards and discarding any open ones. Clean the squids and cut them in rings. Set aside.
  • Finely slice the shallots and roughly chop the garlic.
  • In a cooking pot heat vegetable oil, once heated add cumin seeds, coriander seeds, black peppercorn and whole red chillies. As the seeds crackle add the chopped ginger and garlic, sauté on medium heat for 2-3 mins. Now add the sliced onions and cook unit soft and translucent. Add the grated coconut and cook for further 5 mins.
  • Add turmeric powder  and cook for another couple of minutes.
  • Remove from heat and let the mixture cool before transferring it to a blender. Blend the mixture to a thick smooth paste by adding ½ cup of water. Add more water if desired to reach the right consistency.
  • Transfer the paste back to a clean cooking pot and add 1 cup of warm water and bring to a boil. Cook for further 7 mins. Add salt and continue cooking for 2 more mins.
  • Now add the coconut milk and bring the sauce back to boil. Stir in the aniseed powder and curry leaves. Start by adding the cod first and cooking it for 5-7 mins on medium heat. Be careful while you stir from this stage onwards as you don’t want to break the fish. Now add the prawns, mussels and squids. Carefully fold the seafood in the sauce, cover the cooking pot with a lid and simmer on medium heat for another 5-7 mins. Be careful not to over cook the seafood.
  • Once cooked add vinegar and mix. Remove from heat garnish with some fried curry leaves. Accompanied perfectly with steam rice.

 

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Safed Maas (Royal Chicken Korma)

Inspired by my travel to India last year. I had the privilege of tasting a few old classics. Two interesting dishes that stood out were “cream chicken” and “safed maas” both being distant cousins of the Korma clan. IMG_5758-0 Cream Chicken is a particular dish that has been raved about throughout Northern India and I was keen to sample this delicacy. Brain child of the Late Attar Singh Chawla, he introduced this dish in the early 1960’s in a small town called Nainital. This unique chicken curry is cooked with onion, milk and cream, flavored with black peppercorns and green cardamon. A simple dish transformed to a whole different tangent. Absolutely scrumptious and mind blowing, best eaten with Garlic Naan.

Safed Maas on the other hand is an age old recipe from the Rajput cuisine of Rajasthan . Safed means white and Maas translates to meat. This particular dish was traditionally cooked with goat meat. The gravy which imparts the white element was cooked with onions, ginger paste, garlic paste, yoghurt, cashew nuts, almonds, poppy seeds, coconut, dried red chillies and whole spices. This dish was truly fit for royalty. IMG_3846 After tasting both these dishes I went back to my kitchen to produce a cross between the two using chicken as the principal meat. The results were exceptionally good. I have put down the recipe on this blog and would encourage everyone to try out this delectable dish.

Recipe Serves 4-6 people

Cooking time – 45 mins

Ingredients 2 whole chicken deskinned approx 800 gms each (cut into medium sized pieces)

2 tbsp desi ghee (clarified butter)

6 tbsp vegetable oil

4 bay leaves

6 green cardamom

4 cloves

2 black cardamom

1 inch cinnamon stick

2 mace

12 whole dried red chillies

1/2 tsp hing (asafoetida)

1 tsp white pepper powder

1 tsp crushed black pepper

1/2 tbsp roasted cumin powder

1/2 tsp green cardamom powder

1 tsp dried fenugreek leaves powder

Salt to taste 4 medium sized onions finely chopped

2 tbsp of garlic paste

2 tbsp of ginger paste

200 gms yoghurt

150 gms Cashew nuts

200 ml double cream

Method

1. Heat ghee and oil in a cooking pot. Once heated add all the whole spices except the dried red chillies and asafoetida, let the flavour of the spices release into the oil. This will take around a minute cooking on medium heat.

2. Add the chopped onions and cook until the onions are about to turn golden brown in colour. Do not let them completely change colour. Now add the ginger and garlic paste and sauté until the paste is cooked. This process will take around 5-7 minutes on high heat.

3. Add the chicken pieces to the pot and stir well. Add salt at this stage and sauté for 7-8 mins. Add all the powdered spices except dried fenugreek powder. Lower the heat to minimum and add the yoghurt followed by cashew nut paste. To make the cashew nut paste, boil the the cashew nuts for 10 mins, drain and let them cool. Process the nuts in a food blender with enough water. The paste should have a milkshake consistency.

4. Once the cashew nut paste is added mix well for for couple minutes on high heat. Add the dried whole chillies and one cup of warm water. Lower the heat and cover the pot with a lid and cook for 15 mins until the chicken is cooked.

5. Once the chicken is cooked, remove the lid and increase the heat and stir for further 5-7 mins until the liquid is evaporated and you are left with a thick gravy. The oil should have surfaced to the top of the cooking pot by now. Add the dried fenugreek powder and cream. Mix for a couple of minutes more on high heat. Check for seasoning. To make dried fenugreek leaves powder take dried fenugreek leaves and roast in a pan over medium heat for a couple of minutes, stirring continuously. Transfer to a clean plate and crush the leaves with your palm. You will be left with a fine powder. Strain this powder through a strainer or sieve.

6. Once the chicken is ready. Remove from heat and cover the pot with a lid and let it rest for 15 mins before serving. Serve the Safed Maas with luccha parantha or roomali roti accompanied with onion salad.

I hope you enjoy cooking this recipe. Looking forward to your feedback.

Happy cooking. IMG_6122

Dhabe Ka Gosht (Highway Lamb Curry)

Inspired by the “Dhabas” of India, this dish features not only on their menu but is now cooked around the globe. A simple rustic curry is slow cooked over charcoal heat traditionally. I was keen to share this recipe. It’s simple to cook and full of flavour.

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Preparation time – 15 mins
Cooking time – 20 mins
Serves 3-4 people

Ingredients

750 gms leg of lamb diced (on the bone)
3 medium size onions
2 medium size tomatoes
2 tbsp ginger and garlic paste (2 parts of garlic and 1 part of ginger)
5 fresh green chillies
1/2 bunch coriander
Ginger Julienne for garnish
1tsp turmeric
2tsp red chilli powder mild
1tsp coriander powder
2 tsp cumin powder
1 tsp Garam masala
1/2 tsp kasoori methi (dried fenugreek)
Salt to taste
3 pods green cardamom
1 pod black cardamom
3 bay leaves
1 stick cinnamon
6 tbsp mustard oil or vegetable oil
1 tbsp desi ghee
Juice of half a lemon.

Method

1. Wash the lamb in cold water and drain the water. Finely slice onions. Finely chop tomatoes and slit green chillies.

2. In a cooking pot heat mustard oil. Once heated add all the whole spices. Cook the spices for about a minute till all the flavour is released in the oil. Now add the sliced onions and cook until slightly golden in colour.

3. Add the lamb and sauté for further 10 mins. Add the salt. Now add ginger and garlic paste. Cook for further 10 mins.

4. Add the powdered spice except for Garam masala and kasoori methi. Cook for further 5 mins until the spices and incorporated evenly. Add 2 cups of hot water. Cover the pot with a lid and cook on low heat for 20 mins.

5. Remove the lid after 20 mins and add the chopped tomatoes and cook on high heat for 5-7 mins. Lower the heat add another cup of hot water and simmer for further 20 mins or until the meat is tender. I always add potatoes to my curry so if you prefer you can add two potatoes cut in quarters at this stage.

6. Remove the lid and mix well. Add Garam masala, kasoori methi, finely chopped coriander, lemon juice and desi ghee. Increase the heat and cook for 2-3 mins. Once done transfer into a serving bowl and garnish with ginger Julienne and chopped coriander . Serve with hot chapatis or steam rice and onion salad.

You have to cook this dish to believe how simple and easy it is to make a curry. I have attached a brief video about the recipe below. Do leave your feedback.
Happy cooking.

Awadhi Gosht (Lamb) Biryani

The name Biryani is derived from the Persian word beryā(n) (بریان)

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This royal dish is believed to find its roots in the rustic kitchens of the Mughal Emperors in 1800.

The traditional method to cook biryani was by a method called “Dum” it simply means to breathe in. A very heavy bottomed pot is used for cooking in which the food is tightly sealed with a “Purdah” also known as veil which is a simple dough made of water and flour used to seal the pot with the lid and the food is cooked on slow fire. This process of slow cooking releases maximum flavour and aroma.

The legend has it that the Biryani was brought to India from Persia through Afghanistan by the Arab traders, another source indicates that the biryani was brought by Emperor Taimur Lang from Persia to India as early as 1394.

Although there are many legends regarding discovery of biryani in India, the Islamic Persians have made the biryani popular in India. In 1856, Nawab Wajid Ali Shah introduced Biryani to Calcutta which became Calcutta Biryani. This Biryani was cooked with meat and whole boiled potatoes.

The Biryani from Lucknow is also know as the “pulao” and is supposed to be a more refined version. Its prepared in a different way as compared to the Biryanis prepared in the other states of India. A major difference is using “Yakhni” which is a rich mutton stock. Its also supposed to be quite delicate to the palate.

Below is the detailed recipe and a brief video to guide you through. I have slightly tweaked the recipe however the authenticity of the dish is maintained.

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Recipe

Serves 8-10 people

Cooking Time – 3 Hrs

 

Ingredients

2 kg Leg of Lamb diced on the bone

1kg Basmati Rice

8 medium size Onions

3 Large Potatoes (Optional)

1 cup Ginger and garlic paste

14 Cloves

4 Star Anise

12 Green Cardamom

4 Mace

2 stick of Cinnamon about one inch each

6 Bay Leaves

12 Whole Black Peppercorn

6 Whole Kashmiri Red Chillies

11/2 tbsp Cumin Powder

11/2 tbsp Red chilli Powder

11/2 tbsp Garam masala powder

1/2 tbsp Nutmeg Powder

1tsp of Saffron Strands

100 ml of Rose water

100 ml of Kewra(Screw pine) Water

1 Cup of Milk

1 cup of Ghee

1/2 cup of Vegetable Oil

1 Tbsp of Lemon Juice

Salt to taste

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Method

Preparing the Yahni (Stock):

1. Take a cooking pot and add about 5 Ltr of water. Add 21/2 tbsp of salt, 1 cup of Ghee, 1 cup of ginger-garlic paste and half a cup of oil. Add all the whole spices, leaving 6 cloves, 4 green cardamom and saffron aside. Add the powdered spices keeping aside half tbsp each of cumin powder, red chilli powder and the garam masala powder. Add 50 ml of rose water and 50 ml of kewra water. Bring it to a boil.

2. Ask your butcher to dice slightly large pieces of the leg of lamb on the bone. This is also termed as “biryani boti” as the biryani uses a larger cut of the leg, compared to curry pieces. Once the broth comes to a boil add the lamb pieces. Cover with a lig and cook for approximately 1.5 hrs on medium heat until the meat is tender.

3. While the yahni is cooking, finely slice the onions and deep fry until golden brown. Remove from the fryer and drain on kitchen towel. Peel the potatoes and dice into 4 large pieces each. Boil the potatoes with 1 tbsp of salt and 1 tsp of turmeric. Keep aside once cooked. Wash and soak 1 kg of good quality basmati rice for at least an hour. Take half a cup of cold milk add saffron, rose water and kewra water, mix well and refrigerate.

4. Once the lamb is cooked remove the pieces with a pair of tongs or slotted spoon. Strain the stock through a muslin cloth or fine sieve. Your stock should have been reduced by half now. Discard the spices.

Assembling the biryani:

5. In a heavy bottom cooking pot add 1 tbsp of ghee, once heated add the lamb pieces, sauté for a couple of minutes and add the fried onions, 3/4th of the yakhni or the strained stock, 1 cup of milk, 1/2 tbsp of cumin powder, 1/2 tbsp of chilli powder and half tbsp of the garam masala powder. Cook for further 10-15 mins stirring continuously on high heat until the liquid comes to a slight syrup consistency. check for seasoning. At this stage the salt should be on a slightly higher side Remove from heat, add the boiled potatoes and keep aside.

6. In another cooking pot bring water to boil and add 3 tablespoon of salt, 6 cloves, 4 green cardamom, 1 tbsp of lemon juice and add 1/4 of the yakhni or the strained stock. Once the water comes to a boil, drain the rice and add to the pot, cook until 3/4 done.

7. Drain the rice in a collander and layer it on the mutton broth. Once you have transferred all the rice to the pot, level it with a flat spoon. Sprinkle milk and saffron mixture on the rice and seal the pot with aluminium foil making sure the steam doesn’t escape the pot. Add a lid on top and cook on Dum (simply means to breathe in. A very heavy bottomed pot is used for cooking in which the food is tightly sealed with a “Purdah” also known as veil which is a simple dough made of water and flour used to seal the pot with the lid and the food is cooked on slow fire. This process of slow cooking releases maximum flavour and aroma.) for 45 mins. I have used aluminium foil to seal the pot as its an hassle free substitute compared to sealing it with a dough.

There are two ways to give “dum” you could place a flat heavy bottomed tawa on your gas burner on low heat and place the pot on it or place the pot in a convection oven at around 100 degree Celsius for 45 mins.

8. After the “dum” remove the lid and the foil. Once you remove the foil using a flat spoon very delicately mix the rice bringing the meat to the surface. Spoon onto a serving dish accompanied with a mint or a cucumber raita.

Tips:

Biryani or Pulao has always been a complicated dish to pull off. However a few tips will surely make it more easier.

1. While cooking the lamb and potatoes make sure not to over cook them as later when we layer the rice and the lamb broth it will cook further 45 mins on Dum. I always cook my lamb and potatoes 90 % and let them finish cooking on dum resulting in fork tender meat and soft and fluffy potatoes.

2. Make sure you check your seasoning at every stage of cooking.

3. As soon as the rice is cooked, drain and immediately layer it on the broth. If you leave the rice in the colander for long the steam in the rice will overcook the rice as a result your end product will be a lumpy overcooked Biryani. Timing and precision are very crucial while cooking the rice.

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Murgh Dakshini (Chicken Curry from the Southern Coast of India)

India’s language, religion, customs and food differ from place to place within the country, but nevertheless possess a commonality. India is the only country in the world to have so many religions and beliefs. The food culture of India is an amalgamation of these diverse subcultures spread all over the Indian subcontinent and traditions that are several millennia old. Despite this diversity, some unifying threads emerge. Varied uses of spices are an integral part of food preparation, and are used to enhance the flavor of a dish and create unique flavors and aromas. Cuisine across India has also been influenced by various cultural groups that entered India throughout history, such as the Persian, Mughal and European Colonists. In this blog I again try to illustrate a simple Chicken curry inspired from the southern coast of India – Kerala, also referred to as Chicken Malabari. I have slightly tweaked the recipe with the addition of Hing – also known as Asafoetida (a spice well known for its digestive aid and a flavour enhancer.) and boiled eggs. 

 

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Serves 4

Cooking time 45 Mins

 

Ingredients 

1 Kg Chicken Breast diced

4 Medium Onions (finely chopped)

3 Fresh Tomatoes (finely chopped)

1 Tbsp Ginger Paste

2 Tbsp Garlic Paste

2 Sprigs of curry leaves

2 Tbsp finely chopped fresh Coriander

3 Fresh Green Chillies (finely chopped)

1 Tsp Mustard seeds

1/4 Tsp Hing Powder (Asafoetida)

1 Tbsp Kashmiri Red Chilli powder

1/2 Tbsp Turmeric Powder

1/2 Tbsp Coriander Powder

1/2 Tbsp Cumin Powder

1/4 Tsp Finely crushed Black pepper

1/4 Tsp Fennel Powder

300 ml Coconut Milk (Unsweetened)

1 Tbsp Desiccated Coconut (pan roasted)

1 Tbsp Fresh Lemon juice

200 ml vegetable oil

Salt to taste

4 boiled eggs

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Method

1. Heat oil in a cooking pot. Add hing and mustard seeds, once the seeds crackle add the curry leaves.

2. Add the chopped onions and cook until golden in colour. Now add the ginger-garlic paste and cook for further 5 mins.

3. At this stage lower the heat and add the dry spices. Stir for 30 seconds and add 1/4 cup of warm water and cook for further 5-7 mins.

4. Add the chopped tomatoes, mix well and cook on high heat for 5 mins. Now add 1 cup of warm water and cook further for 8-10 mins on medium heat until tomatoes are cooked and incorporated.

5. Add the chicken and salt. Stir until the masala evenly coats the chicken. Reduce the heat, cover the pot with a lid and cook for 10-15 mins until the chicken is tender and cooked through.

6. Remove the lid after 10 mins and increase the heat. Add the chopped green chillies, coconut milk and cook for further 5 mins until the gravy slightly thickens.  Add the boiled eggs and chopped coriander, continue cooking for further 2 minutes. Finish with lemon juice.

7. Transfer into a serving bowl and garnish with desiccated coconut and coriander leaves. Serve hot with appam or malabari paratha and perfectly paired with a glass of 2010 Mandala Sauvignon Blanc .

I have added a small video that guides you through the steps.

 

Dahi aur Khade Masale ka Murgh (Chicken cooked with yoghurt and whole spices)

The Mughals and Persians from western Asia brought their rich artistic and gastronomic culture of eating meat to India. This influence lasted for more than 400 years and is now part of the fabric of Indian culinary culture.The splendor of the Mughal rule is reflected in the Mughlai Cuisine of India which is the richest and the most lavish in the country.

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Punjab has bequeathed the institution of Dhaba to the world. The Dhaba moves wherever a Punjabi goes would be the correct thing to state about its origin. Dhabas were food stalls which were often run by single families and mushroomed all along the trunk road serving fresh regional cuisine. The dhabas mainly gained popularity in the Northwestern part of the country from Peshawar to Punjab. The dhabas were characterised by open kitchens, clay ovens also know as tandoor and used brass and copper utensils. Dhabas today have become very popular all over the country and many modern versions have evolved.

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I have selected one of the most popular dishes from their menu a simple chicken curry cooked with yoghurt and whole spices.

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Serves 6-8 people

Cooking time 40 mins

 

Ingredients

2 Baby chicken whole (approx 900 gms each)

Whole Spices 

3 bay leaves

1 stick cinnamon 5 cm

6 green cardamom

4 cloves

1/2 tbsp Cumin seeds

7-8 whole kashmiri red chillies

 

4 tbsp vegetable oil

4 tbsp desi ghee

4 medium onions

250 gms ginger and garlic paste (100 gms ginger & 150 gms garlic)

500 gms yoghurt

125 ml double cream

25gms or around 1 heaped tbsp kashmiri chilli powder

1/2 tbsp turmeric

1 tbsp cumin powder

1 tbsp coriander powder

1 tsp garam masala powder

Salt to taste

3 tbsp chopped coriander

 

Method

1.Clean chicken and trim any excess fat. Cut each chicken into approximately 18 pieces or you can ask your local butcher to do that for you.

2. In a pan heat oil and ghee. Once heated add all the whole spices. The idea here is to make sure that the spices release their flavour into the oil. Make sure not to burn the spices.

3. Add 4 finely chopped onion and saute until slightly brown, we don’t want the onions to be golden brown. Just a slight colour on them will do.

4. Now add the ginger and garlic paste and saute for 7-10 mins until the ginger and garlic paste is cooked.

5. At this stage add all the dry spices except the garam masala powder. Before you add the spices I would recommend to add 2 tbsp of hot water to the cooking pan, give a quick stir and then add the spices. This will prevent the dry spices from burning and help impart the best flavour possible,.

6. Saute for further 2 mins and add the chicken pieces, at this stage add the salt. Saute the chicken for 7-10 mins until evenly coated with the masala.

7. Lower the heat to minimum and add the yoghurt . Mix well and increase the heat. Saute for further 5 mins. Lower the heat back to minimum and cover the pan with a lid and cook for further 15 mins.

8. Remove lid and increase the heat. Saute on high heat for further 5-7 mins or until the gravy has slightly thickened. At this stage add the cream, chopped coriander and garam masala powder. Cook for further 5 mins.

9. The Chicken curry is now ready. Serve hot with chapatis or rice and finely sliced onions with a dash of  lemon on the side.

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I can say this with full assurance and confidence that is will be the best form of Chicken curry you have ever tasted. Simple yet gratifying and scrumptious.

Looking forward for your feedback once you have made it.

 

I have put together a short video below which demonstrates the various stages of cooking the above recipe.